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Thank you for being a valued Nature’s Perspective Customer. Below you will find important information covering your new landscaping. Learn more about caring for your new plants, sod, seeded lawns, outdoor lighting and more.

Caring For New Landscape Plants

The first two weeks after the installation of your plants is critical to their survival. Plan to be available to “baby” your new plants during this important time of establishment.

Watering every 3-4 days is necessary for trees and shrubs. Perennials and groundcovers should be watered more often because their root balls are much smaller, approximately every 2-3 days.

Ideally, water is best applied early in the day but it is more important to water thoroughly and deeply than to worry about the time of day. The thing to remember about plant establishment is WATER, WATER, WATER. You may want to invest in a hose, timer and sprinkler to help.

If you have an irrigation system, it is crucial that you inspect it carefully to make sure that it is reaching all the new plantings. Almost all systems need adjustment after plant installation. Also, make sure it is set to give adequate water for plant establishment, not maintenance.

Trees and Shrubs: Place the open end of the hose at the base of the plant and allow it to gently flow onto the root ball of the plant. The rate of flow should be such that it soaks into the soil without running off or puddling. You can water each plant individually— five to ten minutes per four feet of plant, or place a sprinkler to cover the area for several (3-5) hours. We do not recommend use of a soaker hose or an irrigation system as the only source of water during this initial establishment period.

Groundcover and Perennials: Because these plants have much smaller root balls than their woody companions, they will need more frequent watering. Sprinklers are probably the easiest way to apply water. A sprinkler should be set to run for one to two hours allowing water to penetrate the top 6-12″ of soil.

After the first two weeks, the new plant material will need less frequent watering. At this time, you should reduce watering to 1-2 times per week. Hot, windy weather will call for more frequent watering. Each watering must be a deep, thorough soaking.
For established plantings, the rule of thumb is to apply one inch of water per week during the growing season. This can be accurately measured by setting a can or rain gauge in the planting area and making sure the sprinkler, or the sky fills it to the recommended amount at least once per week (please note, one inch of water wets the soil to a depth of 8-10″).

Water throughout the growing season (the time between the last and first frost) until Thanksgiving for leaf and root system development. The mulch we have applied will help in maintaining soil moisture. During cool, wet periods such as spring, less watering will be needed; during dry, windy periods common in summer or fall, more.

It is important to check the soil conditions by probing the soil with a shovel or trowel if you are unsure as to its moisture condition. If it is dry, add water, if it is moist— sit back and enjoy your plantings.

Remember, too much water is as great a danger as too little. A little common sense and observing eyes coupled with these instructions will give your new plants the care they need to flourish. Proper watering during the first growing season is the single most important
factor in successful transplanting.

Caring For A Newly Sodded Lawn

Start watering IMMEDIATELY after the sod is installed. Water frequently and thoroughly for the first 7 to 10 days. When adequately watered, the sod will feel soft when you walk on it. In hot, dry weather, this will mean sprinkling each area every day. In cool moist weather, sprinkling may be necessary only every other day, every third day or not at all after the initial watering.

The proper amount of water will cause the sod to be completely moist and penetrate the underlying soil a couple of inches. If too much water is applied, the ground will be soggy and footsteps will leave indentations. If insufficient water is applied, the sod will first turn a light gray-green color as it wilts, and then turns brown. The proper amount of water will cause the ground to be a little soft, but will still permit foot traffic. Make sure that when watering, there is an overlapping pattern, to avoid dry spots. Pay particular attention to the edges, which dry out quickly.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What time of day is it best to water? Ideally, watering early in the day allows the sun and wind to dry the grass blades while their roots are irrigated. Watering at night can encourage disease, which spreads in damp conditions. There will be less evaporation if the watering is done during a time of day that is not hot and windy. Some literature suggests that there is a danger of burning tender grass if watering is done in hot sunny weather. We have never seen this happen and we have done a great deal of watering in all kinds of weather. Many municipalities have watering restrictions. These typically do not apply to new landscape planting.

When can our new sod be mowed? Once the sod has rooted into the ground and is approximately 3 inches high it should be mowed. This is typically 10 days to 2 weeks after installation. After it has been mowed, continue watering deeply but less frequently, to encourage the grass to develop a strong root system. Deeply rooted grass will withstand stressful environments.

Are there any precautions to be aware of before the first mowing? Allow the lawn to dry sufficiently for the mower to pass over it without leaving ruts (usually 24 hours without water is enough time). Be sure to set your mower to a high setting, about 3”, and mow the sod very carefully. You don’t want to cut off more than about 1 inch of new grass. Clippings should be caught with a grass catcher, or removed to avoid smothering the tender sod. It is important not to wait too long and allow the grass to get too tall before the first mowing. Removing more than 1” of growth can “shock” the grass.

What about after the first cutting? After the first cutting the sod should be knitted down (rooted) and the watering can be reduced. Allow the ground to dry slightly and then water deeply. One inch of water per week in the form of rain or sprinkling is recommended. It is best to apply this water in one or two applications rather than several light sprinklings. he object is to keep as little moisture as possible on the surface where the shallow rooted weeds like to grow. At the same time, you want to encourage the grass roots to grow deeply to seek moisture. Water regularly until Thanksgiving.

Helpful Hints:

  • Never water by hand if you can use a sprinkler. Not many people have the time or patience to hold a hose for as long as is usually needed.
  • When setting sprinklers, start with the furthest point in the yard. Moving the sprinkler may be accomplished by pulling on the hose rather than walking in the freshly watered area.
  • Be sure that the corners and edges are thoroughly covered. Overlap settings so that there are no gaps in the areas being watered.
  • Use timers to shut the water off if you are not available to do so manually.
  • To get a feel for how long it takes to water, use a rain gauge, coffee can, or straight-sided jar set under a sprinkler to see how long it takes to apply one inch of water.

Caring For A Newly Seeded Lawn

The first five weeks after your lawn is seeded is critical to the new seeds’ survival. Plan to be available to care for the seeded area during this important time of establishment. You will need to follow the instructions below to ensure the successful establishment of your lawn. You may need to invest in a hose, timer and sprinkler to help during this period of establishment, as well as throughout the spring, summer and fall seasons.

1) All traffic should be kept off the newly seeded area until the first mowing, which is in approximately five weeks.

2) It is important to keep the seed covering (peat moss) damp for the first two weeks. You can expect seed germination and visible growth in approximately two weeks. Once the seedlings have germinated, they should not be allowed to dry out. Water often, rather than deeply. Only the top one inch of soil needs to be kept moist during the establishment period. Avoid creating puddles in the soil. Once grass is well established, it should be watered infrequently and deeply. Deeply rooted grass will withstand stressful environments better.

3) Five weeks after successful germination, the grass should be ready to mow. This is weather-dependent; warmer weather will encourage more rapid germination and growth.

4) The grass can withstand high traffic approximately six weeks after seeding. In general terms, this is after it has been mowed twice.

5) Herbicidal weed killers may be applied after the second mowing.

6) Fertilizer was applied at the time of seeding, and will not be necessary for approximately two months. After this period, it is important to remember that all new lawns will need regular fertilization and broadleaf weed control. Lawns should be fertilized each spring and fall for proper growth.

7) If new topsoil was added, you may experience some weed growth along with your new grass. Most of these weeds are annuals and will be cut off with your first mowing, or crowded out as your lawn matures.

8) The peat moss covering we have applied will help in maintaining soil moisture and promote germination. Dry, windy days mean more frequent watering, cool wet periods need far less. It is important to check to see if the soil is moist. If it is dry, add water. Remember, too much water is as great a danger as too little.

A little common sense and observant eyes, coupled with these instructions, will give your newly seeded lawn the care it needs to flourish.

Caring For An Overseeded Lawn

The first few weeks after your lawn is seeded are critical to the new seeds’ survival. You may need to invest in a hose, timer and sprinkler to help during this period of establishment, as well as throughout the spring, summer and fall seasons.

1) It is important to keep the seed covering (peat moss) damp for the first two weeks. Early spring seeding (March and April) usually does not need daily watering. Nature provides spring rains that are sufficient for germination. Once seedlings have germinated, they should not be allowed to dry out. Water often, rather than deeply. Only the top inch of soil needs to be kept moist during the initial establishment period. In contrast, once established, grass should be watered infrequently and deeply to encourage deep rooting. Deeply rooted grass plants withstand stress better.

2) Fertilizer was applied at the time of seeding, and will not be necessary for approximately two months. It is important to remember that new lawns need regular fertilization and broadleaf weed control after the new grass has matured a month or two. An established lawn should be fertilized each spring and fall for proper growth.

3) If new soil was added, you may experience some weed growth along with your new grass. Most of these weeds are annual seedlings and will be cut off with your first mowing, or crowded out as your lawn matures. The peat moss covering we have applied will help in maintaining soil moisture and promote germination. Dry, windy days mean more frequent watering, cool wet periods need far less. It is important to check to see if the soil is moist. If it is dry, add water. Remember, too much water is as great a danger as too little.

A little common sense and observant eyes, coupled with these instructions, will give your newly seeded lawn the care it needs to flourish. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call us immediately.

Our Plant Warranty

Woody Plants: We will replace one time, without charge, any tree, shrub, evergreen, groundcover or vine planted by us that dies within a period of two years from the date of installation.

Perennials, Ornamental Grasses & Roses: We will replace one time, without charge any perennials, ornamental grasses and non shrub roses
planted by us that die within a period of ninety days from the date of installation. The ninety days excludes the period between November 1st and April 1st.

This limited warranty is contingent upon the homeowner carrying out the above watering instructions as well as the following: Pest Control: Keep plants free of
injurious insects and diseases by timely and proper application of pesticides. Cultivation: Keep plants free of weeds.

Non-Warrantied Items: We provide no warranty for any plant material planted above ground in containers, flowering bulbs, annual plants or owner’s plants that we plant or transplant.

Our warranty is void if:

  • Payment is not made in full and within 30 days of the invoice date
  • Plants are damaged by man, animal, insects, mechanical damage, negligence, and acts of God.
  • Plants are not planted in the ground.
  • Plants are damaged by misuse of herbicides or pesticides by the homeowner or any of its agents.

*Please refer to our contract for complete details regarding our warranty.

Our Lawn Warranty

Sodded Lawns: We will replace one time, without charge, any sod planted by us that dies within a period of thirty days from the date of installation. If re-sodding or patching is necessary, this work will be performed as soon as the weather and season permits.

The above warranty is contingent upon the homeowner carrying out the above watering and care instructions as well as the following: Pest control: Keep plants free of injurious insects and diseases by timely and proper application of pesticides.

Our warranty is void if:

  • Payment is not made in full and within 30 days of the invoice date
  • Plants are damaged by man, animal, insects, mechanical damage, negligence, and acts of God.
  • Plants damaged by misuse of herbicides or pesticides by the homeowner or any of its agents.

*Please refer to our contract for complete details regarding our warranty.

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